Hunger as an Issue in our World today – Post #5

In my previous post (post #4), I gave a detailed knowledge on how the government and other organizations have contributed toward the goal of eradicating hunger. There were some lacking of actions between the government systems and not much has been done yet. The issue is still a major topic in our world today and therefore, action must be taken by the government and other organizations. In this post, I will be talking about some possible solutions that could be helpful in eradicating hunger around the world. This post will include organizations that have helped in taking a stand in this issue, suggestions on how nations should contribute to the issue, and also a little bit on the government and its political will.


 

There are some organizations that are slowly working their way towards eliminating hunger in our world today. Hilal Elver implies that “the greatest challenge for the sustainable development goals (SDGs) is to eradicate poverty and hunger while maintaining sustainable food security for all in a crowded and dramatically unequal world” (Guardian News). Elver’s point is that we need to focus on eradicating poverty and hunger in our world by working with other organizations and even the government. With that in mind, “Upholding women’s financial, educational and legal rights would be the best use of funds dedicated to eradicating hunger, poverty and child undernourishment” (Elver). In other words, the government can support women’s rights to finance, education, and legal rights so that those funds could be used to contribute toward the goal of eradicating hunger. In order to eradicate hunger, the political will of the government needs to be exercised in solving hunger (Elver). Elver is surely right about saying that strong political will could contribute towards eradicating hunger because, as she may not be aware, recent research have said that “Eradicating hunger requires commitment—political will. It will require sustained efforts in many areas, particularly pro-poor investments in rural areas, where the majority of the world’s most vulnerable live” (Silva). In addition to having powerful forces like the government contributing towards eradicating hunger, other powerful nations such as the United States should consider contributing to this subject too.

In Per Pinstrup-Andersen’s journal “Feeding the World in the New Millennium,” he suggests that powerful nations like the United States “should make the eradication of hunger the top priority of its relations with developing countries, as the Presidential Commission on World Hunger recommended 20 years ago” (29). Andersen is recommending that if powerful nations like the United States took into consideration the goal of eradicating hunger together by working with other developing countries, there may be a greater chance of actually eliminating hunger in our world. That way, many lives will be saved and there would not be several cost on the lives of the people. Speaking of powerful nations, the United States is also known for being the world’s wealthiest country. So, if America could increase aid to developing countries, it would be really supportive (Andersen, 29). Andersen then went on stating how America would be a helpful nation in solving hunger by suggesting that “The United States should target aid resources based on need (i.e., to countries with high levels of poverty and hunger, particularly in South Asia and Africa)” (29). Andersen’s theory of the United States providing aid to countries that are suffering from poverty and hunger is extremely useful because it shed insight on the difficult problem of people in developing countries that need a lot of assistance because they are the ones who are undergoing poverty and hunger. However, Josette Sheeran argues in her journal, “Preventing hunger: Sustainability not aid” by saying, “Food aid has saved millions of lives, but it cannot, by itself, solve hunger” (470). Sheeran is right that food aid itself cannot solve hunger, but she seems on more dubious ground when she claims that food aid cannot by itself solve hunger. If food aid is saving millions of lives, then we must think positive and believe that as people rely on food aid, this might influence government and other associations to provide more food aid. By doing that, the concerns of hunger would slowly and eventually be solved. Furthermore, we must consider the main responsibility of how we can go about in contributing to solving the problem of hunger.


 

Sources:

Elver, Hilal. “Why are there still so many hungry people in the world?.” Guardian News 19   Feb 2015. Print.

Graziano da Silva, José. “Opinion: We Can End Hunger. Here’s How.” National Geographic 16 Oct. 2015: 1-3. Print.

Pinstrup-Andersen, Per. “Feeding The World In The New Millennium.” Environment 43.6 (2001): 22. MasterFILE Complete. Web. 4 Mar. 2016.

Sheeran, Josette. “Preventing Hunger: Sustainability Not Aid.” Nature 479.7374 (2011): 469. MasterFILE Complete. Web. 4 Mar. 2016.

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Hunger as an Issue in our World today – Post #4

In my previous post (post #3), I talked about the issue itself and the places in the world that are most common for experiencing hunger as an issue in their lives. That was on developed and developing nations, and how they help each other in some ways. I also gave you a lead on how the government and other organizations have taken care of the issue. So, in this post, I am going to talk about the government and other organizations, and how they have contributed in eradicating hunger as an issue or not. This post will include how the government and other organizations have contributed to solve the issue of hunger in our world today. In the end of the last paragraph, there will be a transition leading on to my next post.


 

According to Hilal Elver, she argues that “Although the world has succeeded in reducing poverty in accordance with the millennium development goal (MDG) targets, food security and adequate nutrition have not been achieved” (Guardian News). Elver is basically stating that even though systems like MDG tried to help reduce the issue of hunger, they failed to succeed at all. The MDG has declined to help reduce the issue of hunger because they “failed to treat food as a human right” (Elver). I concur that Elver said the MDG saw the issue of hunger as a non-existing difficulty of human right because my experience of seeing other people in the world experiencing famine confirms it. Food must be treated as a human right. Everyone needs food in order to survive because without it no one can live a healthy life. Not only did the MDGs fail to see hunger as “human rights” but, according to Elver, “Experience shows us that neither markets nor governments protect access to sufficient and nutritious food for everyone” (1). What Elver is saying is that the government and other organizations are too weak and ignorant to look at the bigger picture of hunger. These people that are starving to death may be at the point of choosing either between hope and moving on in life or giving up.  As Josette Sheeran writes in her journal “How to End Hunger,” she claims that “Without food, people do one of three things: revolt, migrate, or starve. When governments can no longer provide food security, states fail” (5). Governments need to improve their game and help those poor people in suffering nations around the world and solve this issue of hunger. Furthermore, governments, organizations and even nations must help to solve hunger by reducing it or even getting rid of it for everyone’s sake.

Hilal Elver suggests that “The SDGs should encourage governments to work towards policy coherence: agricultural policies should be compatible with environmental sustainability and trade rules consistent with food security” (Guardian News). Hilal is saying that the SDG (sustainable development goals) needs to step up and advise the government to take an action on this topic because a good government system that supports a policy might create an active force in ending an issue. According to Clare Ulrich, she quoted Pinstrup-Andersen’s comment on the how biased the policies were without empirical evidence when he said: “It’s the combination of appropriate policies and the application of science that will make the difference in the lives of poor and hungry people” (18). Anderson is insisting that policies and science should work together to put an end to an issue. Since Andersen’s “current research focuses on the effects of globalization” (Ulrich, 18), he made a statement to Ulrich by saying: “his chief interests is to gather empirical evidence that he can use to propose international and domestic policy interventions that will change the outcome of globalization to enable poor people to escape poverty, redistribute income more equitably, and support sustainable development” (Ulrich, 18). I agree with Andersen’s statement when he made a comment saying, “Once people earned their Ph.D.’s, they would conduct research according to what they thought farmers needed rather than ask the farmers what they wanted” (Ulrich, Page #18) because those scientist need to consider digging more into the needs of farmers, rather than focusing on the general idea. As a fact, it is a good idea to see the main cause of hunger rather than focusing on the bigger picture. In addition to science and empirical evidence, as I mentioned earlier, the government needs to act now because progress have not been made in solving hunger in our world today.

The case of hunger needs to be fixed because innocent people are losing their lives. Governments, together with other organizations, must act now because “Acting now can also avoid higher economic and human costs down the road” (Sheeran, 4).  It will help us have a better economic cost and we may even save a lot of lives. I am on the same page of the idea that we should act now because if we don’t, then those delays would mean “lost and shattered lives for the youngest and most vulnerable, and a future of poverty for their families, communities, and countries” (Sheeran, 4). That would not be a better outcome so we must not allow such things as losing lives and living in poverty in this world. According to Jennifer Clapp, she writes that “Uneven distribution of both food production and food trade, and poor access to food, are the key reasons that people continue to go hungry in this world of plenty” (3). It is accurate that uneven distribution of food production and trade, and poor access to food cause people to go hungry in this world because in my experience of watching documentaries and video clips about the people who are experiencing starvation confirms it. Also “Poor weather, economic difficulties, and violent conflict create short- and even long-term food shortages affecting millions of people” (Andersen, 26). Basically, Andersen is saying that hunger could come from poor weather conditions, economic difficulties and violent conflicts in the lives of those innocent people around the world. Just to be clear, “Hunger is not just a problem of consuming too little food. Diets may also lack vitamins and minerals” (Andersen, 26). With that being said, “Roughly 75 percent of people in the developing world consume too little iron: one billion suffer from anemia as a result” (Andersen, 26). In other words, Andersen believes that when people lack too much iron in their body systems, they may suffer from starvation because having to eat less each day may result in harmful life. According to Hilal Elver, she stresses that “The world produces enough to feed 10 billion people. Poverty and hunger prevail because of economics, not scarcity” (Guardian News). I’m of two minds about Elver’s claim that poverty and hunger prevail because of economics, not scarcity. On the one hand, I agree that we live in a world where there is enough to feed 10 billion people. On the other hand, I’m not sure if scarcity causes poverty and hunger to prevail. It is a known fact that a lot of developing countries are so poor that they do not have enough to eat. After talking about developing countries in my previous paragraphs, we can come to a conclusion that hunger and poverty exist because of both economic and scarcity and other causes of hunger that I mentioned earlier. Also with all those effects and impacts that hunger has in our world today, could we think of a better way to work our way out of hunger? What might be some possible solutions to end hunger in our world?


 

Sources:

Elver, Hilal. “Why are there still so many hungry people in the world?.” Guardian News 19   Feb 2015. Print.

Ulrich, Clare. “Enlightened Policies Can Benefit The Poor And Hungry.” Human Ecology 33.2 (2005): 16. MasterFILE Complete. Web. 4 Mar. 2016.

Sheeran, Josette. “How To End Hunger.” Washington Quarterly 33.2 (2010): 3. MasterFILE Complete. Web. 4 Mar. 2016.

Clapp, Jennifer. “World Hunger And The Global Economy: Strong Linkages, Weak Action.” Journal Of International Affairs 67.2 (2014): 1. MasterFILE Complete. Web. 4 Mar. 2016.

Pinstrup-Andersen, Per. “Feeding The World In The New Millennium.” Environment 43.6 (2001): 22. MasterFILE Complete. Web. 4 Mar. 2016.

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Hunger as an Issue in our World today – Post #3

In my previous post (post #2), I talked about the issue of hunger and what effects it had on the lives of the people around the world including babies and pregnant mothers. I also gave an insight on the possible diseases that could come from the issue itself. In this post, I am going to talk about the places where hunger is most common at. This will include information on developing and developed nations or countries around the world, how the different economic nations help each other in some ways, and a transition toward government and other organizations that are somewhat helpful in solving the issue.


 

This then leads into places that are mainly struggling with the concern of hunger. The locations that are common for having insufficient food are mainly developing countries and also few developed countries as well. Even though “We have made considerable progress since 1990” (Silva), Josette Sheeran reminds us that “Hunger is still on the march. Risk and volatility define a global economy in which seemingly isolated food price and supply shocks increasingly ripple outward to developing nations, often with broad and devastating effects” (14). Sheeran’s point is that hunger is a big issue that we need to take action against and help others as they go through the devastating effects. Hunger is not a problem where we can solve very quickly but it is necessary to reduce the causalities that it has in our world today. Speaking about developing areas, “One of every five people in the developing world is hungry” (Clapp, 23). Clapp’s whole point is that hunger is a terrible issue that needs to be solved immediately because people are enduring famine. Hilal Elver addresses that “Of the world’s hungry people, 98% live in developing countries” (Guardian News). That statistic itself is horrifying because it’s depressing to know that some people in our world today live in a terrible world of their own. Just like developing countries suffering from hunger, developed nations are also suffering too. With developed nations, they suffered many damages from natural disasters and some of those effects were taken care of by the governments or other organizations.

According to Josette Sheeran, “In developed countries, livelihood and asset losses sustained in natural disasters are often covered by international insurance, capital markets, or government budgets which act as contingency funds” (9). Developing nations are unfortunate because “About 1.2 billion people in developing countries – almost five times the U.S. population – live on $1 a day or less. These people often cannot afford to buy all the food they need, although they may spend 50 to 70 percent of their incomes trying, and many do not have access to land to produce food” (Andersen, 24). Andersen is saying that people who live in the world’s poorest nations are suffering from having enough to eat in a day. Many people are dealing with this misery from hunger because they are not fortunate enough to satisfy their needs. Besides, developing nations and developed nations may support one another to overcome hunger in our world.

Despite the fact that both developing nations and developed nations carry their own differences, one must look to another as an example for help. For example, developed countries may “provide technical assistance and financial support for poor countries’ agriculture, as well as technical support to developing countries to create strong animal and plant health standards so that they can produce for developed country markets” (Andersen, 25). Also, both the developed nations and developing nations are already working together in some cases because “Developed countries stand to gain from support for agricultural research for developing countries. For example, high – yielding varieties of wheat and rice bred by the Future Harvest centers for use in developing countries are now widely planted in the United States as well as in the developing world” (Andersen, 27). Andersen is informing us that both developed and developing nations are already supporting each other by planting crops like wheat and rice in their countries. It would be amazing to gain more support from developed and developing nations because if those nations support each other from importing or exporting crops, the problem of hunger would be reduced.  Speaking about developing nations and developed nations supporting each other to solve hunger, governments and other institutions may be helpful or not helpful in some ways too.


 

Sources:

Graziano da Silva, José. “Opinion: We Can End Hunger. Here’s How.” National Geographic 16 Oct. 2015: 1-3. Print.

Sheeran, Josette. “How To End Hunger.” Washington Quarterly 33.2 (2010): 3. MasterFILE Complete. Web. 4 Mar. 2016.

Clapp, Jennifer. “World Hunger And The Global Economy: Strong Linkages, Weak Action.” Journal Of International Affairs 67.2 (2014): 1. MasterFILE Complete. Web. 4 Mar. 2016.

Elver, Hilal. “Why are there still so many hungry people in the world?.” Guardian News 19   Feb 2015. Print.

Pinstrup-Andersen, Per. “Feeding The World In The New Millennium.” Environment 43.6 (2001): 22. MasterFILE Complete. Web. 4 Mar. 2016.

 

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Hunger as an Issue in our World today – Post #2

In my first post, I gave a brief introduction on hunger and also talked about its causes. This post is going to contain information about the effects that hunger has on the people that are suffering from it.


 

With people dealing with starvation, it is really sad to see that the issue itself can lead to life-threatening damages. Clare Ulrich argues that “Five to six million preschool children die each year from hunger and malnutrition and poverty. Further, poverty and hunger prevent 114 million children from doing something many Westerners take for granted — completing primary school” (16). By looking at the statistics alone, that is actually a lot of innocent children who could have had a chance of living and experiencing what other children are involved with right now such as playing a sport or even attending schools. On the other end, Hilal Elver points out that “According to the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), almost 1 billion people suffer from chronic hunger and almost 2 billion are under-or-over nourished” (Guardian News). This is heartbreaking because most of the time, we do not realize that some of the people around the world are starving for food. Children suffer mainly by lacking nutrition, which results in having 5 million die each year (Elver, 1). Not only children, but pregnant mothers tend to be affected by malnutrition, which causes pregnant mothers to bear babies who are suffering from low-birth-weight and are weak from malnutrition (Anderson, 24). Malnutrition is not healthy because it can cause severe difficulties in both the mother and the baby. The baby might be at the point of dying because he or she might lack enough strength and weight to live.

Along the same lines of malnutrition, it can also come from having less food that would not satisfy the good health and condition of a person. Jennifer Clapp claims that “Hunger remains a serious global problem. Over 840 million people in the world are chronically undernourished, but due to the manner in which hunger is measured, this figure may underestimate the true scale of the problem” (2). Clapp is stating that hunger is a huge problem in our world and not all of the people have access to having a good meal in order for them to be in a healthy condition. Going further into the topic of undernourishment, Josette Sheeran agrees that hunger is an obstacle by stating “Nearly two-thirds of all undernourished people in the world live in Asia and the Pacific, precisely in the regions where the transformative seeds, fertilizers, pesticide, and irrigation technologies of the Green Revolution contributed to some of the largest gains in farm yields” (Page 6). In making this comment, Sheeran reports that regions like Asia and the Pacific are common for having the dietary deficiency as a problem because of the type of area they live in. According to Josette Sheeran, she adds that “Over the course of a troubled history, Haiti has suffered more blows than most, from the food price riots that toppled the government in late 2008 to frequent natural disasters. But far too many others in countries across Asia, Africa, the Caribbean, and beyond now hover just one earthquake, cyclone, conflict, or drought away from widespread hunger and acute malnutrition” (3). Sheeran is implying that the problem of hunger itself may come from natural disasters that cause malnutrition.


 

Sources:

Ulrich, Clare. “Enlightened Policies Can Benefit The Poor And Hungry.” Human Ecology 33.2 (2005): 16. MasterFILE Complete. Web. 4 Mar. 2016.

Elver, Hilal. “Why are there still so many hungry people in the world?.” Guardian News 19   Feb 2015. Print.

Pinstrup-Andersen, Per. “Feeding The World In The New Millennium.” Environment 43.6 (2001): 22. MasterFILE Complete. Web. 4 Mar. 2016.

Clapp, Jennifer. “World Hunger And The Global Economy: Strong Linkages, Weak Action.” Journal Of International Affairs 67.2 (2014): 1. MasterFILE Complete. Web. 4 Mar. 2016.

Sheeran, Josette. “How To End Hunger.” Washington Quarterly 33.2 (2010): 3. MasterFILE Complete. Web. 4 Mar. 2016.

 

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Hunger as an Issue in our World today – Post #1

In this first post, I am going to introduce the topic of hunger itself and move on into the causes of hunger. This would help you understand the topic and lead you to an understanding of where the issue comes from.


Throughout my whole life, I have been told that I must not take things for granted because other kids are suffering. When I was a kid, during meals, my parents would tell me to eat what is on the plate and never complain about it. Now I came to realize that it is important to take things as they come and not argue or say that “I would rather have this food than that food” or “I don’t like this food, it doesn’t taste delicious at all.” All these come down to the point of where we complain about the possessions we are very fortunate to own in our life such as food. This then brings us to the topic of hunger. One of the common effects of poverty is hunger. It should be examined and be solved by the government, other organizations, and communities before it is too late to save a life.

Hunger is one of the main issues in our world today. Some people don’t see famine as a problem because we, as privileged individuals, are helplessly blind to those who are in need of vital necessities. Unfortunately, other people in the world are suffering from hunger and are going through a lot of struggles in their lives regarding poverty as well. What needs to be addressed is the issue of hunger and its main cause, its results or effects, who is experiencing it,  how much the government is putting into the matter, which countries are mostly suffering from it, why it is still a matter in our world today, and possible solutions to end starvation.  

It is often said that poverty is a state of being extremely poor. The problem of hunger itself fits in here because hunger is when someone does not receive sufficient food to eat in order to gain enough energy and vital nutrients. According to Hilal Elver, “It is the economic system that is responsible for this prevalence of poverty and hunger. Recently, climate change has been added to the list of causes” (Guardian News). Climate change could be a contributor to the issue of hunger because Josette Sheeran agrees by stating that “And almost without exception, the countries struggling to feed their people are those most at risk from advancing climate change” (5). Not only is climate change seen as a cause of hunger but Sheeran also claims that “The poor become hungry for many reasons, ranging from the disastrous combination of high prices and global recession to conflict, disease, marginalization, discrimination, bad governance, and natural disasters” (3). Also, Hilal Elver admits that “The root causes of food insecurity and malnutrition are poverty and inequity rather than shortages” (Guardian News). Elver and Sheeran are saying that the causes of hunger are mainly natural disasters, economic struggles, weak government, disease, poverty and inequity.  If those root causes are the main reasons behind the hunger, then there has to be a well-planned action that could be done to diminish those causes. People go through a lot in their lives, even if it means to be hungry or just suffering from poverty. As a result, when people experience this miserable issue in their lives and starve to death, experiencing the effects of hunger itself can lead to major harm to their lives.


 

Sources:

Elver, Hilal. “Why are there still so many hungry people in the world?.” Guardian News 19   Feb 2015. Print

Sheeran, Josette. “How To End Hunger.” Washington Quarterly 33.2 (2010): 3. MasterFILE Complete. Web. 4 Mar. 2016.

 

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Hunger as an Issue in our World today-A Series of Posts

This weak, I’ll be starting a series of posts based on one of the main issue that we have in our world today. The issue that I will be posting a series of posts about is on hunger. This includes how the government handles the issue, which countries are affected by it, it’s main causes,who is suffering from it, why it is still an issue in our world and some possible solutions to end this issue.

I chose to write my research paper on the issue of hunger because of its effects and problems that it causes in the lives of the people around the world and our communities that we live in. Having to read about documentaries, seeing news and even reading about life stories has caused me to write my research paper on hunger too. The topic itself seems to be an issue that a lot of people are not aware of what it is and the troubles that it has on the people’s lives. With hunger, there has been a lot of damages and casualties over the years.

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Writing for Community Awareness – Mt. Zion Baptist Church

Early in the beautiful Sunday morning, the sun rose up high in the white clouds. It painted just a little bright spot up in the clouds and the whole view outside was really appealing to the eye. As amazing as Sunday morning felt already, everyone got up and began to get ready for church. I was really excited to actually go out and worship together with my sibling at Mt. Zion Baptist Church in Lincoln, Ne. Now, having been to a Lutheran church and other churches that I’ve visited, I was a little bit anxious and nervous to experience service at Mt. Zion Baptist Church. But that didn’t seem like a big matter right now.

Even though it was a sunny Sunday morning, it was a little bit windy and chilly outside. Making our way to the car, my second oldest sister pulled up the location of the church and were ready and set to take off. As we drove to Mt. Zion Baptist Church, we were running a little bit late because I told them earlier that church started at 10:30 a.m. in the morning. When we arrived at our location, 3301 N 56th St Lincoln, NE 68504, everyone got out of the car and began to walk to the entrance. Before I even closed the door of the car, a quick glance of wind hit me right in the face. Then suddenly, the feeling of nervousness began to jump inside me but I kept it to myself. Also, everyone began to glance at each other as we walked to the entrance because they weren’t sure if they dressed appropriately just in case the Baptist Church followed a certain dress code. Despite the fact that we weren’t  sure of the dress code, we decided to give it a try.

On our way to the main entrance, we saw a couple of people walk past us and greeted us with a Goodmorning. Then on our way to the worship area,  a choir lady smiled at us and said, “Good Morning everybody.” As we walked into the worship area, I was really impressed with the arrangement of the worship area. I was astounded by what I saw and my first impression was “Wow.” As a new face at Mt. Zion Baptist Church, I couldn’t help myself but look around and inspect the whole area, and all the church members.

We thought we were late but the church hadn’t started yet. One of the ushers that stood at the door handed out the order of worship pamphlet and led us to our seats. Being completely new to this place, we decided to sit in the far back row. But then the ushers came by and said, “Goodmorning everyone. Please, could we have you all move up just a little bit.” And we all stood up and moved closer. As the choir group made their way up to the stage, I smiled to myself because I suddenly got a vibe that it would be a traditional southern style of worship and the majority of people there were African American. Most of the ladies wore bright matching clothes with big hats. The choir group were in their large full uniforms and even the pastor’s gown complimented the choir’s uniform.

Suddenly, the earth below my feet felt warm as the choir made their way to the stage. As soon as I saw the pastor, Reverend Dr. Michael W. Combs on the altar, I knew that service was about to start. The whole congregation seemed really nice and very welcoming with smiles on their faces. They had a lead singer who opened the service with two beautiful songs along with other choir members. The sound of the drums along with the piano and the choir group had the congregation dancing and praising the Lord. It was really uplifting. As I mentioned earlier, experiencing a Baptist Church was my first time ever so there were a lot of things that were new and surprising to me. When I glanced through the pamphlet, I realised that the order of service was completely different from what I was used to seeing in Lutheran churches or other churches I’ve visited.

The order of service for a Baptist Church is very different from a Lutheran Church. Lutherans tend to begin their Sunday Service with an opening song, maybe confessions, another song, bible readings, then another song again and finally the sermon. After the sermon we do offerings, sometimes communion (before offering), benediction and a closing song. From my visit to Mt. Zion Baptist Church, the program started with praise and worship, a few scripture readings, songs, announcements and welcoming of guests, worship, prayer, greeting the whole congregation (individually everyone greets people), offerings, creative dance, scripture reading, worship, pray, and finally the sermon. The  sermon is the last activity of the service. From my experience, their program was long because it was about 3 hours long. Lutheran’s have a shorter program, which lasts for a maximum of one hour so spending 3 hours was a new experience for my siblings and me.

Despite the fact that it was different, I thought it was really amazing. The most important thing is that we all serve the same God. During service, the whole atmosphere kept on getting warmer and warmer with praise and worship. It almost felt like I was in a concert, giving praise and worship to God. The service went really well but right before the sermon, we all had some problem with controlling our physical hunger. It was weird because it was also our first time and we didn’t know when the service would end. We did not want to be disrespectful so we continued sitting down with hungry stomachs. The most important thing was that spiritually, we were filled with an amazing message and had a really great time during the service.

Overall, I thought that it was a nice Sunday Service. The warmer the atmosphere got, the happier we all felt after service. As we walked out of the worship room, few people greeted us and one of the lady said, “You’re always welcome here anytime.” Then after the service, we went straight home and fed our physical body as the time ran like the wind.

Mt. Zion Baptist Church, Lincoln Nebraska

Mt. Zion Baptist Church, Lincoln Nebraska

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